Travels from Dostoevsky’s Siberia: Encounters with Polish Literary Exiles

Travels from Dostoevsky’s Siberia: Encounters with Polish Literary Exiles

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Edited and translated by Elizabeth A. Blake

Series: Studies in Comparative Literatures and Intellectual History
ISBN: 9781644690215 (hardback) / 9781644690222 (paper)
Pages: approx. 260 pp.; 2 illus.
Publication Date: May 2019

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Translations in Travels from Dostoevsky's Siberia, gathered from archives and appearing in English for the first time, offer a fresh look at Dostoevsky's House of the Dead from the perspective of his fellow inmates and Siberians who were imprisoned, tortured, and exiled by the regime of Nicholas I. Drawing on archival resources and illustrations, introductory essays immerse the reader in the experience of the political prisoners who must navigate the criminal environment of verbal, physical, and sexual abuse by negotiating with inmates and authorities alike. These eyewitness accounts introduce the reader to Dostoevsky's unfortunates—condemned to share his experience of Russia's carceral system with its interrogations, denunciations, and hostile spaces—whose psychoses become the writer's obsession in his celebrated crime novels.


Elizabeth Blake is an assistant professor of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures at Saint Louis University and author of Dostoevsky and the Catholic Underground (Northwestern 2014). Her articles on Fedor Dostoevsky, Lev Tolstoy, and Polish exiles have appeared in Dostoevsky Studies, Slavic and East European Journal, Polish Review, and edited collections.


Table of Contents

Acknowledgements
A Note on the Text


Introduction

1. A Siberian Memoir about the Dead House
A Few Words on Józef Bogusławski
A Siberian Memoir by Józef Bogusławski

2. Omsk Affairs
An Introduction to Rufin Piotrowski
“Arrival in Omsk” from Memoirs from a Sojourn in Siberia
“The Martyrdom of Prior Sierocinski”

3. Beyond Omsk
Notes on the Lives of Bronisław Zaleski and Edward Żeligowski
“Polish Exiles in Orenburg”
Correspondence about the Petrashevsky Affair