50 Writers: An Anthology of 20th Century Russian Short Stories

50 Writers: An Anthology of 20th Century Russian Short Stories

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Valentina Brougher & Mark Lipovetsky (Eds.)
Translated by Valentina Brougher, Mark Lipovetsky, & Frank Miller

Series: Cultural Syllabus
ISBN: 9781936235148 (hardcover) / 9781936235223 (paper)
Pages: 792 pp.
Publication Date: March 2011

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The largest, most comprehensive anthology of its kind, this volume brings together significant, representative stories from every decade of the twentieth century. It includes the prose of officially recognized writers and dissidents, both well-known and neglected or forgotten, plus new authors from the end of the century. The selections reflect the various literary trends and approaches to depicting reality in this era: traditional realism, modernism, socialist realism, and post-modernism. Taken as a whole, the stories capture every major aspect of Russian life, history and culture in the twentieth century. The rich array of themes and styles will be of tremendous interest to students and readers who want to learn about Russia through the engaging genre of the short story.


Valentina Brougher (PhD University of Kansas) is Professor Emerita, Department of Slavic Languages, Georgetown University. Her articles on 20th century Russian writers have been published in major academic journals, and her translations of 20th century prose have appeared in anthologies and special editions.

Mark Lipovetsky is Professor of Russian Studies in the Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures and joint faculty member at the Comparative Literature Program at the University of Boulder. He is the author of Paralogies: The Transformations of (Post)Modern Discourse in Russian Culture of the 1920s-2000s (2008) and Charms of Cynical Reason: Tricksters in Soviet and Post-Soviet Culture (2010).

Frank Miller (PhD 1976, Indiana University) is a Professor at Columbia University.


Reviews

Valentina Brougher, Mark Lipovetsky, and Frank Miller have rendered an important service to the profession by compiling a rich, judiciously selected, and carefully translated anthology of twentieth-century Russian short stories. . . . Offering a wealth of cultural and historical material, this book may serve as an introduction to twentieth-century Russian culture. Alternatively—and to my mind more fruitfully—this compilation will cater to those students and general readers who already possess knowledge of this realm and seek to enrich it further, often in unexpected and exciting ways. Of existing English-language anthologies of modern Russian short stories, 50 Writers is by far the most expansive. . . .
— Sofya Khagi (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor), Slavic and East European Journal, vol. 58, no. 4 (Winter 2015)
I’ve seen many English-language anthologies of Russian literature, but this is the first one that I want to give to all my non-specialist friends, so that they can finally understand what is so wonderful about modern Russian literature.
— Eliot Bornstein, Professor of Russian & Slavic Studies at NYU and the author of Overkill: Sex and Violence in Contemporary Russian Popular Culture
This selection of mainly newly translated stories from the 20th century includes both well-known writers and new voices. It eschews traditional selections from the former category and presents startling writings from the latter. As the editors-translators put it themselves in their lucid introduction, these stories together form a ‘mega-novel’ about Russia of the previous century from its first revolution to post-perestroika times.
— Irene Masing-Delic, Ohio State University
If you like the short-story genre, don’t pick up this addictive collection unless you are prepared to be lost in its riches for a considerable time. These beautifully translated, haunting Russian tales written from 1901 to 2001, almost all previously unpublished, read so smoothly that they are seductive. And, as the editors suggest, if the stories are read as they are arranged, chronologically, the continuity of certain themes makes the whole lot into ‘a kind of amazing mega-novel, with different heroes, historical periods and situations which nevertheless resonate with one another and become intertwined. . . .’
— Priscilla S. Taylor , The Washington Times

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Glossary
Introduction


1. LEONID ANDREYEV
Once Upon a Time
2. FYODOR SOLOGUB
The Invoker of the Beast
3. ALEKSANDR KUPRIN
Gambrinus
4. ALEKSEI REMIZOV
The Little Devil
5. ELENA GURO
Thus Life Passes
6. ARKADY AVERCHENKO
Four People
Scenes from the Life of the Worker Pantelei Grymzin
7. NADEZHDA TEFFI
Black Iris
8. MIKHAIL BULGAKOV
The Red Crown
9. MIKHAIL ZOSHCHENKO
Black Magic
The Female Fish
10. ISAAC BABEL
Gedali
The Rabbi
The Rabbi’s Son
11. MIKHAIL SHOLOKHOV
Family Man
12. LEV LUNTS
Outgoing Paper No 27
13. VSEVOLOD IVANOV
The Gardener of the Emir of Bukhara
14. ALEKSEI TOLSTOY
The Viper
15. EVGENY ZAMYATIN
The Flood
16. ANDREI PLATONOV
Doubting Makar
17. DANIIL KHARMS
Blue Notebook Number
Old Women Tumbling Out
Kushakov the Carpenter
A Dream
The Start of a Very Nice Summer Day
The Lynching
18. VLADIMIR NABOKOV
Lake, Cloud, Tower
19. SIGIZMUND KRZHIZHANOVSKY
The Smoky Glass Goblet
20. IVAN BUNIN
Tanya
21. ANDREI SINYAVSKY
The Tenants
22. VARLAM SHALAMOV
Eulogy
23. FRIDRIKH GORENSHTEIN
The House with a Turret
24. VASILY AKSYONOV
“Victory” 
25. YULI DANIEL
Hands
26. KONSTANTIN VOROBYOV
A German in Felt Boots
27. FAZIL ISKANDER
My Uncle of the Highest Principles
28. VASILY SHUKSHIN
Chudik
I Believe! 
29. VLADIMIR TENDRYAKOV
Bread for a Dog
30. YURY KAZAKOV
You Cried Bitterly in Your Sleep
31. YURY DOMBROVSKY
Little Arm, Leg, Cucumber
32. SERGEI DOVLATOV
My Older Cousin
33. BULAT OKUDZHAVA
Girl of My Dreams
34. TATIANA TOLSTAYA
The Fakir
35. VIKTOR EROFEYEV
Galoshes
36. VLADIMIR MAKANIN
Surrealism in a Proletarian District
37. VLADIMIR SOROKIN
Passing Through
38. ALEKSANDR SOLZHENITSYN
The Young
39. LEONID YUZEFOVICH
Butterfly. 1987
40. OLEG ERMAKOV
The Last War Story
41. VIKTOR PELEVIN
A Short History of Paint-ball in Moscow
42. LYUDMILA ULITSKAYA
Th e Queen of Spades
43. YURY BUIDA
More and More Angels
The Samurai’s Dream
44. YURY MAMLEYEV
Currency
45. IRINA POLYANSKAYA
Snow Falls Ever So Quietly
46. LEV RUBINSHTEIN
Teachers without Pupils, or from under the Rubble
Into the Mausoleum of Thine
47. VLADIMIR TUCHKOV
The Lord of the Steppes
48. LYUDMILA PETRUSHEVSKAYA
Never
49. MARINA VISHNEVETSKAYA
Experience in Demonstrating Mourning
50. ANDREI LEVKIN
The Dump