Tag: Slavic Studies

Academic Studies Press to host “Pushkin after 1831: Dedicated to the 190th Anniversary of ‘The Bronze Horseman'”

Academic Studies Press to host “Pushkin after 1831: Dedicated to the 190th Anniversary of ‘The Bronze Horseman'”

Academic Studies Press is pleased to host “Pushkin after 1831,” an international online conference commemorating the 190th anniversary of The Bronze Horseman. Gathering together the most prominent specialists on Pushkin from both sides of the Atlantic, this four-day conference encompasses an extensive array of topics that will engage attendees within the global Slavic Studies community.

ASP’s 2022 Year in Review

ASP’s 2022 Year in Review

Academic Studies Press would like to wish everyone a very happy and healthy New Year! Though we’re already a few days into 2023, what better time to reflect on what a year 2022 was; we’ve compiled a list of some of our favorite reviews, noteworthy media mentions, notable 2022 releases, and more. Here’s to 2023!

Read the World 2022: An ASP Reading List

Read the World 2022: An ASP Reading List

As a publisher that’s values efforts to improve the accessibility of works from all over the world through translation, ASP is excited to be joining the American Literary Translators Association (ALTA) in celebrating works in translation, their translators, and their publishers by participating in Read The World, an online bookfair taking place over social media from September 30 (International Translation Day) to October 7. To celebrate, we’ve compiled a reading list of some of our favorite recently published and forthcoming translations.

“My Hebrew Writing and the MGB Informer”: Excerpt from Zvi Preigerzon’s “Memoirs of a Jewish Prisoner of the Gulag,” with an introduction by Alex Lahav

“My Hebrew Writing and the MGB Informer”: Excerpt from Zvi Preigerzon’s “Memoirs of a Jewish Prisoner of the Gulag,” with an introduction by Alex Lahav

We are pleased to present here an adapted excerpt from Zvi Preigerzon’s Memoirs of a Jewish Prisoner of the Gulag, translated from the Hebrew, accompanied by a personal introduction from editor and translator Alex Lahav. The book tells the story of Zvi Preigerzon’s arrest, interrogation, and imprisonment in the Gulag and describes many of the Jewish prisoners whom he met there.

Defining Patriotism, Citizenship, and Betrayal: Excerpt from “Don’t Be a Stranger” and a personal introduction from Jason Galie

Defining Patriotism, Citizenship, and Betrayal: Excerpt from “Don’t Be a Stranger” and a personal introduction from Jason Galie

We are pleased to present here an excerpt of Don’t Be a Stranger: Russian Literature and the Perils of Not Fitting In, accompanied by a short personal introduction in which the author, Jason Galie, situates the volume’s analysis of the svoj/chuzhoj dichotomy in Russian society and literature within the larger context of the current war in Ukraine. Don’t Be a Stranger explores the consequences of being marked an outsider in the Russian-speaking world through a close study of several seminal works of Russian literature. The author combines the fields of literary studies, linguistics, and sociology to illuminate what prompted Christof Ruhl, an economist at the World Bank, to comment, about Russia, “On a very broad scale, it’s a country where people care about their family and friends. Their clan. But not their society.”