Tag: history

“Working for the Enemy” and “Blackmail”: Excerpt from Roman Dziarski’s “How We Outwitted and Survived the Nazis” with an Introduction by the Author

“Working for the Enemy” and “Blackmail”: Excerpt from Roman Dziarski’s “How We Outwitted and Survived the Nazis” with an Introduction by the Author

We are pleased to present here an excerpt from Roman Dziarski’s How We Outwitted and Survived the Nazis: The True Story of the Holocaust Rescuers, Zofia Sterner and Her Family, accompanied by a personal introduction from the author. The book tells the story how his family  rescued Jews from the Holocaust and survived WWII, against the backdrop of the realities of the Nazi and Soviet occupation of Poland.

When Ksawery Met Moses

When Ksawery Met Moses

This is a guest post by Wiesiek Powaga, translator of Palestine for the Third Time, a book of reportage originally published in Poland in 1933 by Ksawery Pruszyński, a young reporter working for a Polish newspaper on assignment in Mandate Palestine. Here, Powaga introduces Pruszyński and his formative friendship with Mojżesz Pomeranz.

Going Sephardi for Purim

Going Sephardi for Purim

This Purim I used the privilege of working as Production Editor at Academic Studies Press in a completely new way: I cooked from the proofs. Not that I used the paper with printed text as an ingredient or to make fire but having the early access to the content of one of our forthcoming titles, Sephardi: Cooking the History. Recipes of the Jews of Spain and the Diaspora, from the 13th Century to Today by Hélène Jawhara Piñer, I went through the PDF on my screen and selected four recipes which looked easy to cook and delicious—thanks to the seductive photos the author made for the book. Indeed these dishes were quick and simple, and with no ingredients too exotic for a regular supermarket.

Excerpt: Winston S. Churchill and the Shaping of the Middle East by Sara Reguer

Excerpt: Winston S. Churchill and the Shaping of the Middle East by Sara Reguer

By October 1922, when the Lloyd George Government fell from power, the British Empire had reached its maximum territorial extent and seemed on the point of stabilizing all its imperial relationships. One of the newest areas to come under direct British control was a large section of the Middle East. The problem presenting itself to the British Government was how to deal with these new territories under the changed world conditions. There are innumerable elements to this problem and to treat the whole sub­ject in equal depth for the whole period—from the acquisition of the Middle East until the end of Lloyd George’s reign—would be a daunting task. The present attempt is more modest.

Postcards from a Ukrainian Past: An excerpt from Epic Journey by Andrei Kushnir

Postcards from a Ukrainian Past: An excerpt from Epic Journey by Andrei Kushnir

We are pleased to present an excerpt from Epic Journey: The Life and Times of Wasyl Kushnir by Andrei Kushnir. The book presents an account of the author’s father, Wasyl Kushnir, in his own voice, as he and his family lived through the harsh Soviet regime in Ukraine, famine during the Ukrainian Holodomor, and forced labor in Germany during World War II, eventually emigrating to the U.S., making a new life and raising a family. The following excerpt presents selections of postcards sent to Wasyl Kushnir (mostly from his parents) during the years 1943–1944, with a short introduction from Andrei Kushnir.

A Japanese Righteous Gentile: The Sugihara Case

A Japanese Righteous Gentile: The Sugihara Case

In honor of Holocaust Remembrance Day, January 27, 2020, we are sharing an excerpt from Meron Medzini’s Under the Shadow of the Rising Sun: Japan and the Jews during the Holocaust Era. This book is Open Access and freely available at OAPEN.org.

In the Avenue of the Righteous Gentiles in the Yad Vashem Holocaust memorial in Jerusalem, Japan is represented by one individual deemed worthy to be included: a man who helped some 6,000 Jews escape from Lithuania in the summer of 1940. His name was Vice Consul Sugihara Chiune (or Sugihara Sempo), who granted transit visas to Japan to some two thousand, six hundred Polish and Lithuanian Jewish families, thus saving them from either probable extermination by the Germans or prolonged incarceration or Siberian exile by the Soviets.