Titles  |   About ASP Open

 

Current number of titles: 60 (sixty)


11/15/2018

One new publication added to ASP Open:

New Directions in the History of the Jews in the Polish Lands

Edited by ANTONY POLONSKY, HANNA WĘGRZYNEK and ANDRZEJ ŻBIKOWSKI

This volume is made up of essays first presented as papers at the conference held in May 2015 at POLIN Museum of the History of Polish Jews in Warsaw. It is divided into two sections. The first deals with museological questions—the voices of the curators, comments on the POLIN museum exhibitions and projects, and discussions on Jewish museums and education. The second examines the current state of the historiography of the Jews on the Polish lands from the first Jewish settlement to the present day.

Making use of the leading scholars in the field from Poland, Eastern and Western Europe, North America, and Israel, the volume provides a definitive overview of the history and culture of one of the most important communities in the long history of the Jewish people.


11/2/2018

Two new publications added to ASP Open through Knowledge Unlatched:

Gendered Violence
Jewish Women in the Pogroms of 1917 to 1921

IRINA ASTASHKEVICH

This is a groundbreaking study of an important and neglected topic—the systematic use of rape as a strategic weapon of the genocidal anti-Jewish violence, known collectively as pogroms, that erupted in Ukraine in the period between 1917 and 1921, and in which at least 100,000 Jews died and undocumented numbers of Jewish women were raped. The book is based on the in-depth study of the scores of narratives of Jewish men and women who survived the pogrom violence, but were then all but forgotten for almost a century. This book deconstructs the motives of perpetrators, the experience and expression of trauma by the victimized community, and how the genocidal objectives of the pogrom perpetrators were achieved and maximized through the macabre carnival of violence.

Macht Arbeit Frei?
German Economic Policy and Forced Labor of Jews in the General Government, 1939-1943

WITOLD W. MEDYKOWSKI

This volume is the first ever study to address Jewish forced labor in Poland's General Government during the Holocaust. The study presents German economic policy on the occupied territories, discussing Germany’s misappropriation and misuse of available resources—particularly human resources and their inhuman treatment—and how this policy ultimately led to the downfall of the Nazi regime. This fascinating study sheds a light on the mutual dependence of economics and warfare during one of the most difficult periods in human history.

 
 

10/18/2018

A digital catalog of our 42 Slavic Studies titles released Open Access through a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation is now available! Read it on Issuu here.

The grant is part of the NEH-Mellon Humanities Open Book initiative. In addition to the free ebooks, ASP has also released a new, low-cost paperback version of each book. Browse the catalog for more information.


3/21/2018

Three new publications added to ASP Open through Knowledge Unlatched:

  Cultures in Collision and Conversation: Essays in the Intellectual History of the Jews  David Berger

Cultures in Collision and Conversation
Essays in the Intellectual History of the Jews

DAVID BERGER

In Cultures in Collision and Conversation, David Berger addresses three broad themes in Jewish intellectual history: Jewish approaches to cultures external to Judaism and the controversies triggered by this issue in medieval and modern times; the impact of Christian challenges and differing philosophical orientations on Jewish interpretation of the Bible; and Messianic visions, movements, and debates from antiquity to the present. These essays include a monograph-length study of Jewish attitudes toward general culture in medieval and early modern times, analyses of the thought of Maimonides and Nahmanides, an assessment of the reactions to the most recent messianic movement in Jewish history, and reflections on the value of the academic study of Judaism.

  Mo(ve)ments of Resistance: Politics, Economy and Society in Israel/Palestine 1931–2013  Lev Luis Grinberg

Mo(ve)ments of Resistance
Politics, Economy and Society in Israel/Palestine 1931–2013

LEV LUIS GRINBERG

In Mo(ve)ments of Resistance, Grinberg summarizes both his own work and that of other political economists, providing a coherent historical narrative covering the time from the beginning of Socialist Zionism (1904) to the Oslo Accords and the neoliberalization of the economy (1994–1996). The theoretical approach of the book combines eventful sociology, path dependency, and institutional political economy. Grinberg argues that historical political events have been shaped not only by political and economic forces but also by resistance struggles of marginal and weaker social groups: organized workers, Palestinians, and Mizrachi Jews. Major turning points in history, like the Separation War in 1948, the military occupation in 1967, and the Oslo peace process in 1993, are explained in the context of previous social and economic resistance struggles that affected the political outcomes.

  Judaism as Philosophy: Studies in Maimonides and the Medieval Jewish Philosophers of Provence  Howard Kreisel

Judaism as Philosophy
Studies in Maimonides and the Medieval Jewish Philosophers of Provence

HOWARD KREISEL

The studies comprising this volume, most of them appearing for the first time in English, deal with some of the main topics in Maimonides’ philosophy and that of his followers in Provence. At the heart of these topics lies the issue of whether they adopted a completely naturalistic picture of the workings of the world order, or left room for the volitional activity of God in history. These topics include divine law, creation, the Account of the Chariot, prophet and sage, Mosaic prophecy, reasons for the commandments, and prayer. Special attention is paid to three lesser known but highly significant Provençal Jewish thinkers: Moses Ibn Tibbon, Levi ben Avraham, and Nissim ben Moses of Marseille.

 
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3/9/2018

Forty-two new publications added to ASP Open:

NEH-Mellon Humanities Open Book Titles

Through a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and in collaboration with the Borderlines Foundation, we are pleased to reissue and market 42 previously published titles in Slavic studies as freely available open-access ebooks. The grant is part of the NEH-Mellon Humanities Open Book initiative. In addition to the free ebooks, ASP will also be releasing a new, low-cost paperback version of each book. The ebooks will be advertised widely in the Slavic studies community, including in all major journals, and through a full-color catalog. To access a free ebook, click the "Read on JSTOR" link. To learn more about a volume, or to purchase a hard copy, click the "Purchase book" link.

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11/16/2016

New publication added to ASP Open:

Italian Jewry in the Early Modern Era
Essays in Intellectual History

ALESSANDRO GUETTA

Series: Perspectives in Jewish Intellectual Life

Between the years 1550 and 1650, Italy's Jewish intellectuals created a unique and enduring synthesis of the great literary and philosophical heritage of the Andalusian Jews and the Renaissance`s renewal of perspective. While remaining faithful to the beliefs, behaviors, and language of their tradition, Italian Jews proved themselves open to a rapidly evolving world of great richness. The crisis of Aristotelianism (which progressively touched upon all fields of knowledge), religious fractures and unrest, the scientific revolution, and the new perception of reality expressed through a transformation of the visual arts: these are some of the changes experienced by Italian Jews which they were affected by in their own particular way. This book explores the complex relations between Jews and the world that surrounded them during a critical period of European civilization. The relations were rich, problematic, and in some cases strained, alternating between opposition and dialogue, osmosis and distinction.


11/11/2016

New publication added to ASP Open:

Exemplary Bodies
Constructing the Jew in Russian Culture, 1880s to 2008

HENRIETTA MONDRY

Series: Borderlines: Russian and East European-Jewish Studies

Exemplary Bodies: Constructing the Jew in Russian Culture, 1880s to 2008 explores the construction of the Jew’s physical and ontological body in Russian culture as represented in literature, film, and non-literary texts from the 1880s to the present. With the rise of the dominance of biological and racialist discourse in the 1880s, the depiction of Jewish characters in Russian literary and cultural productions underwent a significant change, as these cultural practices recast the Jew not only as an archetypal “exotic” and religious or class Other (as in Romanticism and realist writing), but as a biological Other whose acts, deeds, and thoughts were determined by racial differences. This Jew allegedly had physical and psychological characteristics that were genetically determined and that could not be changed by education, acculturation, conversion to Christianity, or change of social status. This stereotype has become a stable archetype that continues to operate in contemporary Russian society and culture.


9/5/2016

New publication added to ASP Open:

Crafting the 613 Commandments
Maimonides on the Enumeration, Classification, and Formulation of the Scriptural Commandments

ALBERT D. FRIEDBERG

Rabbinic tradition has it that 613 commandments were given to Moses on Mount Sinai, but it does not specify those included in the enumeration. Maimonides methodically and artfully crafts a list of 613 commandments in a work that serves as a prolegemenon to the Mishneh Torah, his monumental code of law. This book explores the surprising way Maimonides put this tradition to use and his possible rationale for using such a tradition. It also explores many of the philosophical and ethical ideas animating the composition of such a list. In the book's second half, Friedberg examines the manner by which Maimonides formulated positive commandments in the Mishneh Torah, leading him to suggest new dimensions in Maimonides' legal theory.


8/23/2016

New publication added to ASP Open:

The Codification of Jewish Law and an Introduction to the Jurisprudence of the Mishna Berura

MICHAEL J. BROYDE & IRA BEDZOW

The Mishna Berura is, without a doubt, Rabbi Israel Meir Kagan's greatest and most complex contribution to the canon of Orthodox Jewish Law; it is a singular work that synthesizes Jewish traditions, laws, and mores into a practical halakhic guide to daily religious life. For all of his traditionalism, Rabbi Kagan was an iconoclast, and the Mishna Berura broke from many of the traditional approaches of deciding halakhic directives. Instead, he favored studying, engaging, and asserting decisions in a nuanced, almost natural approach to how ethical people should live their daily lives consistent with Jewish law. Today, the Mishna Berura has gained widespread recognition and is considered authoritative by essentially all of contemporary Orthodox Jewry, a measure of greatness that few works of Halakha have attained. Michael J. Broyde and Ira Bedzow here investigate this seminal text and explore its background and decision-making process.


8/2/2016

New publication added to ASP Open:

Visual Texts, Ceremonial Texts, Texts of Exploration
Collected Articles on the Representation of Russian Monarchy

RICHARD WORTMAN

Series: Imperial Encounters in Russian History

Visual Texts, Ceremonial Texts, Texts of Exploration continues the work begun in Russian Monarchy: Representation and Rule, which analyzed the interplay between the symbolic representations of Russian monarchs and the legal and institutional instruments of their rule. The articles in this volume examine the texts that, through various media, revealed the myths and scenarios conveying the goals and ideals the monarchy sought to elevate before the elite of the empire and, later, the public at large.

Russian monarchy inhabited a highly visual culture, comprising court ceremonials, parades, public festivities, and celebrations. It mobilized the arts through painting, prints, popular pictures (lubki), and even opera. This book examines that artistic culture, focusing on several aspects. Parts I and II analyze imagery and ceremony and their relation to the verbal texts that ascribed and defined their meanings. Part III details the way texts of exploration inspired the explorers who widened Russia’s engagement with the world. Parts IV and V address key texts of intellectual history and reflect on the scholarly and methodological influences on Wortman’s approach to history.


8/2/2016

New publication added to ASP Open:

Russian Monarchy
Representation and Rule

RICHARD WORTMAN

Series: Imperial Encounters in Russian History

This volume from the author of Scenarios of Power explores the effect of the symbolic and mythical representations of the Russian imperial government on law, administrative practice, and concepts of national and imperial identities throughout centuries of monarchical rule. Richard Wortman demonstrates how the ideologies behind such representations shaped the thought patterns not only of the tsar and the imperial family but also of the Russian political and social elite. He characterizes the monarchy as an active agent in Russia’s political experience, one whose dominant role was resisting change until the inevitable collapse facing all absolute monarchies.


7/29/2016

New publication added to ASP Open:

Babel' in Context
A Study in Cultural Identity

EFRAIM SICHER

Series: Borderlines: Russian and East-European Jewish Studies

Isaak Babel (1894–1940) is arguably one of the greatest modern short story writers of the early twentieth century. Yet his life and work are shrouded in the mystery of who Babel was—an Odessa Jew who wrote in Russian, who came from one of the most vibrant centers of east European Jewish culture and all his life loved Yiddish and the stories of Sholom Aleichem.This is the first book in English to study the intertextuality of Babel’s work. It looks at Babel’s cultural identity as a case study in the contradictions and tensions of literary influence, personal loyalties, and ideological constraint. The complex and often ambivalent relations between the two cultures inevitably raise controversial issues that touch on the reception of Babel and other Jewish intellectuals in Russian literature, as well as the “Jewishness” of their work.


7/19/2016

New publication added to ASP Open:

Turn It and Turn It Again
Studies in the Teaching and Learning of Classical Jewish Texts

Edited by JON A LEVISOHN & SUSAN P. FENDRICK

Series: Jewish Identities in Post-Modern Society

The study of classical Jewish texts is flourishing in day schools and adult education, synagogues and summer camps, universities and yeshivot. But serious inquiry into the practices and purposes of such study is far rarer. In this book, a diverse collection of empirical and conceptual studies illuminates particular aspects of the teaching of Bible and rabbinic literature to, and the learning of, children and adults. In addition to providing specific insights into the pedagogy of Jewish texts, these studies serve as models of what the disciplined study of pedagogy can look like. This book will be of interest to teachers of Jewish texts in all contexts, and will be particularly valuable for the professional development of Jewish educators.


6/20/2016

New publication added to ASP Open:

Charms of the Cynical Reason
Tricksters in Soviet and Post-Soviet Culture

MARK LIPOVETSKY

Series: Cultural Revolutions: Russia in the Twentieth Century

The impetus for Charms of the Cynical Reason is the phenomenal and little-explored popularity of various tricksters flourishing in official and unofficial Soviet culture, as well as in the post-Soviet era. Mark Lipovetsky interprets this puzzling phenomenon through analysis of the most remarkable and fascinating literary and cinematic images of soviet and post-Soviet tricksters, including such “cultural idioms” as Ostap Bender, Buratino, Vasilii Tyorkin, Stierlitz, and others. Soviet tricksters present survival in a cynical, contradictory, and inadequate world, not as a necessity, but as a field for creativity, play, and freedom. Through an analysis of the representation of tricksters in Soviet and post-Soviet culture, Lipovetsky attempts to draw a virtual map of the soviet and post-Soviet cynical reason: to identify its symbols, discourses, and contradictions, and by these means its historical development from the 1920s to the 2000s.


6/10/2016

New publication added to ASP Open:

Exotic Moscow Under Western Eyes

IRENE MASING-DELIC

Series: Cultural Revolutions: Russia in the Twentieth Century

This collection of essays on Turgenev, Goncharov, Conrad, Dostoevsky, Blok, Briusov, Gor’kii, Pasternak and Nabokov represents diverse voices but is also unified. One invariant is the recurring distinction between “culture” and “civilization” and the vision of Russia as the bearer of culture because it is “barbaric.” Another stance advocates the synthesis of “sense and sensibility” and the vision of “Apollo” and “Dionysus” creating a “civilized culture” together. Those voices that delight in the artificiality of civilization are complemented by those apprehensive of the dangers inherent in barbarism. This collection thus adds new perspectives to the much-debated opposition of vital Russia and a declining West, offering novel interpretations of classics from Oblomov to Lolita andThe Idiot to Doctor Zhivago.


5/18/2016

ASP Open is pleased to announce our first Open Access publication: 

All the Same The Words Don't Go Away
Essays on Authors, Heroes, Aesthetics, and Stage Adaptations from the Russian Tradition

CARYL EMERSON
with an introduction by David Bethea

Series: Studies in Russian and Slavic Literatures, Cultures and History; Ars Rossica

Twenty-five years of essays and reviews, linked loosely by three themes. First is the creative potential inherent in transposing classic literary texts into other genres of media (operatic, dramatic) and the responsibilities, if any, that govern the transposer, audience, and critic. The practice of transposition, however, gives rise to a creative conflict: is there a limit to the amount of ornamentation, pressure, or dilution to which the “mediated” word can be subject? Finally, the more polemical of the essays included here are structured on the Bakhtinian notion of co-existing “plausibilities” and points of view. What a carnival approach can uncover in Pushkin that might have surprised and even pleased the poet, what a libretto or play script brings out that the “true original” hides: here the work of the creator and the critic can overlap in thrilling ways that respect the competencies of each. The book includes an original preface written by David Bethea.