Research in Jewish Demography and Identity

Research in Jewish Demography and Identity

89.00

Eli Lederhendler & Uzi Rebhun

Series: Jewish Identities in Post-Modern Society
ISBN: 9781618114396 (hardcover)
Pages: 426 pp.
Publication Date:  March 2015

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This book contains fifteen original papers covering, a broad spectrum of topics in Jewish demography and identity, considering both Diaspora communities and the population of Israel. While most of the papers make use of quantitative data, some base themselves on qualitative and archive materials. The book is divided into five parts, reflecting the different complementary dimensions investigated: historical demography, history, and politics, immigration and immigrant adaptation, transnationalism, and demography and identity. This work is presented to Professor Sergio Dellapergola upon his retirement from teaching at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.


Eli Lederhendler is the Stephen S. Wise Professor of American Jewish History and Institutions at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, where he teaches in the Jewish History and Contemporary Jewry Department. He has been the head of the School of History in the Humanities Faculty at the Hebrew University, and has also taught at Yale University, University College London, and Vassar College. His publications in the field of Jewish history span the 19th and 20th centuries, with a focus on Jewish politics, migration, urbanization, and ethnicity. He is co-editor of the annual series, Studies in Contemporary Jewry.

Uzi Rebhun is the Shlomo Argov Chair in Israel-Diaspora Relations at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Currently he is the Head of the A. Harman Institute of Contemporary Jewry at the Hebrew University. He specializes in the demography of world Jewry, Jewish migration, Jewish identification, and the Jewish family.


Reviews: 

. . . Readers who are familiar with Professor DellaPergola’s work will see his influence clearly throughout this volume. The chapters are thoughtful, nuanced, and well-researched, and, like DellaPergola’s long list of publications, tackle diverse subject matter across the Jewish communities of many nations. This book is a fitting tribute to a dynamic researcher and teacher, and scholars of the Jewish community are fortunate that DellaPergola’s work and that of his colleagues and students will continue to benefit us for many years to come.
— Matthew Boxer, Brandeis University, Contemporary Jewry (July 2015)